New Publications from FFPP Fellows Sarah C. Bishop and Seth Offenbach

Congratulations to former FFPP Fellows Sarah C. Bishop (Baruch) and Seth Offenbach (Bronx Community College), for the publications of their new books!  Our Community of Scholars is thrilled to celebrate the realization of your hard work.

Sarah’s book, Undocumented Storytellers:  Narrating the Immigrant Rights Movement (Oxford UP, 2019)  offers “a critical exploration of the ways undocumented immigrant activists harness the power of storytelling to mitigate the fear and uncertainty of life without legal status and to advocate for immigration reform. Sarah C. Bishop chronicles the ways young people uncover their lack of legal status experientially — through interactions with parents, in attempts to pursue rites of passage reserved for citizens, and as audiences of political and popular media. She provides both theoretical and pragmatic contextualization as activist narrators recount the experiences that influenced their decisions to cultivate public voices.”

And Seth’s The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War:  The Other Side of Vietnam (Routledge, 2019), explains how the conflict shaped modern conservatism. The war caused disputes between the pro-war anti-communists right and libertarian conservatives who opposed the war. At the same time, Christian evangelicals supported the war and began forming alliances with the mainstream, pro-war right. This enabled the formation of the New Right movement which came to dominate U.S. politics at the end of the twentieth century. The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War explains the right’s changes between Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan.

on academic publishing

In our conversations about academic publishing at our Professional Development Day on April 12, we received some great advice from the book and journal editors who came as our special guests.  Much of their advice is included in your FFPP Tool Kit.

We also received news of the current call for papers from WSQ, and several opportunities to publish with the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.

And the CFP database hosted by the Department of English at University of Pennsylvania lists a broad range of journal publishing opportunities.

This article from The Chronicle of Higher Education by Steven Pinker, Why Academic writing stinks is available here.

Tenure and Promotion @CUNY

Tenure and Promotion @CUNY

During FFPP’s Professional Development Day on April 12, we put together a  FFPP TENURE AND PROMOTION PRESENTATION of some suggestions that can help pre-tenure assistant professors plan for their tenure and promotion.  While it is necessary that you confirm the expectations and timelines relevant to the standards at your home campus, this presentation can provide a general guide.

PSC CUNY also provides an important summary of faculty rights during the tenure and promotion processes.  It also published on faculty Personnel Files that came up in our discussion.  You can also find more information and advice about your Personnel File and about your presence on CUNYfirst by consulting the faculty handbook on your home campus.  And as always, your Department Chair and Provost are excellent resources as you prepare for tenure and promotion.

New Year, New Goals

Happy New Year, everyone!  Since January is a month when we can energize our commitment to our research and writing goals, its worthwhile to think about how we can chart a course toward success.

 

Former FFPP Mentor Carrie Hintz has offered some timeless advice in her post “On Distraction and Tomatoes,” that is worth revisiting.  She describes the Pomodoro Method that offers three important tips that can help you stay on track with your goals:

 

  • Conceiving of your writing as taking place in small increments of time [25 minutes] rather than enormous, unbroken blocks of time–and progress is absolutely possible within those smaller blocks.
  • Resisting distractions from those 25 minute blocks of time–especially the urge to check email or the news. Often this resistance to distraction takes place 15 or 20 minutes into the writing session, where I can tell myself “only 5 or 10 minutes to go,” so no interruptions allowed.
  • Taking regular breaks, which clears the mind and feels healthier physically and mentally.

It seems so simple, right?  Achieving your goals requires that we establish a plan for our work despite all of the other demands of our personal and professional lives.  Here are a few more tips:

  • Be realistic.  Set goals you can achieve.
  • Make a plan that includes how you can be accountable for your goals–this might include scheduling an hour a day into your calendar, practicing positive self-talk, and trusting your working group peers for encouragement.
  • Tell people about your goals so you can build a community of support.
  • Make note of your small successes.  Every step counts toward your larger goal–be sure to acknowledge every little milestone of your journey.
  • Take it one day at a time.  When you experience a setback don’t beat yourself up.  Get back to your plan and keep moving.

You are part of an amazing community of scholars.  You have already achieved so much–don’t forget you earned a tenure track job in an incredibly competitive market.  Yay you!  You have everything you need to achieve your goals, so go ahead and get to work.  You got this.

 

 

 

Siraj Ahmed Wins MLA Book Prize!

Former FFPP Fellow Siraj Ahmed wins MLA Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies for his book, Archeology of Babel:  The Colonial Foundation of the Humanities (Stanford UP, 2018).

The Archeology of Babel “argues that the privilege philology has always enjoyed within the modern humanities silently reinforces a colonial hierarchy. In fact, each of philology’s foundational innovations originally served British rule in India.

Tracing an unacknowledged history that extends from British Orientalist Sir William Jones to Palestinian American intellectual Edward Said and beyond, Archaeology of Babel excavates the epistemic transformation that was engendered on a global scale by the colonial reconstruction of native languages, literatures, and law. In the process, it reveals the extent to which even postcolonial studies and European philosophy—not to mention discourses as disparate as Islamic fundamentalism, Hindu nationalism, and global environmentalism—are the progeny of colonial rule. Going further, it unearths the alternate concepts of language and literature that were lost along the way and issues its own call for humanists to reckon with the politics of the philological practices to which they now return.”

You can read the Prologue of his prize-winning book from Stanford University Press.

Siraj Ahmed is professor of English at the Graduate Center and comparative literature at Lehman College.

Mid-Career Faculty Fellowship Program–application deadline 10/30

Hello Colleagues!

The Office of Academic Affairs at CUNY’s Central Office has announced a faculty fellowship program for mid-career colleagues.  It provides release time, working groups, and mentoring in the service of promotion to full professor.  The application deadline is October 30.

Please follow this link for the application and more details.

http://www2.cuny.edu/academics/faculty-affairs/faculty-development-across-cuny/mid-career-faculty-fellowship-program/

Happy Summer + Photos+ Updates?

Hello Colleagues!

If you were able to take a head shot during our Publishing Workshop, you’ll be happy to know that your photo is ready!  The always amazing Maryann McKenzie will be sending them to you in the next day or so.  Enjoy!

Over the summer, the Mentors and I will put together our report about the program.  And, as always, we will ask for more resources so that we can make next year’s FFPP bigger and better than ever! If you have comments about the work you’ve done, or about a project, article, or book that is under review, or has been accepted for publication, please let us know.  We’d love to share any and all of your good news.  Please email me directly at shelly.eversley@baruch.cuny.edu

Happy summer from all of us!

 

Happy New Year! Now, Let’s Get Some Work Done

As a new semester begins, I often feel myself renewed, eager, and sometimes nervous, about getting work done.  For me, that “work” is writing–writing a new article, book chapter, or revising something that I believe deserves an audience.  In the spirit of our community of scholars, I’ve got some tips and announcements that might help you execute your plans and alleviate your fears.

If you are writing your first book, please attend the talk, “From Dissertation to First Book:  A Practical Guide” that will take place at the Graduate Center on February 6, at 6:30PM , by Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director,Duke University Press and Director, Intellectuals Publics (CUNY).  Some of you might remember he spoke to our community during one of our Publishing Workshops–Ken is an awesome speaker whose humor and practical advice continues to inspire me as I continue my writing projects.

This article from The Chronicle of Higher Education, “The Habits of Highly Productive Writers”  offers some useful gems and reminders.  Former FFPP Mentor Carrie Hintz’s advice on distractions and carving out time to write really makes sense for those of us who feel like the demands of  teaching and everyday life diminish our productivity.  Her discussion of  “the pomodoro” method is a welcome solution, especially when we are trying to write while we teach.  And, Vilna Bashi-Treitler’s suggestion that we should all form a “No Committee” is a novel way to navigate the extra work of department and college service demands.

My earlier post about online citation tools can help you find the right technology to organize your notes, create works cited lists, and bibliographies.  Using Zotero, for example, has made my ability to collect articles, organize my notes, and integrate citations into my original texts so much easier.

Of course, the work gets done when we commit to doing the work.  This commitment requires that we organize our goals, establish priorities, and schedule regular, inviolable times to write–those times could be 30 minutes a day or 2 hours every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.  The important thing is to keep at it.

Cheers to your productive 2018!

Shelly Eversley

 

 

 

FFPP Alum Professor Libby Garland Wins Organization of American Historians Award

Organization of American Historians (OAH) president Edward L. Ayers announced Kingsborough History Professor Libby Garland as the recipient of the 2017 Germany Residency Program Award in American History at the University of Tübingen, thanks to a grant from the Fritz Thyssen Foundation. As Scholar in Residence, Prof. Garland will teach a seminar on a U.S. history topic of her design.

Prof. Garland will teach “Guarding the Gates: Creating and Policing the Borders of the United States.” The class, to be offered to students in the University’s U.S. history program, will explore the social, cultural, and legal history of U.S. efforts to establish and police its international borders, with particular emphasis on questions of migration control.

 

“As a scholar of U.S. immigration law and U.S. borders, I have closely followed the unfolding debates in Europe over migration and borders,” said Prof. Garland. “In light of these debates, I hope this course will make for particularly meaningful study and discussion for students at the University of Tübingen.”

Prof. Garland, who is looking forward to teaching in Germany at the university level, previously spent a semester of undergraduate study at the University of Freiburg. She later taught English for a year at a public high school in the former East Berlin, during the period when the educational system was just transitioning to a West German model. Most recently, she returned to Germany to conduct archival research for a new project about the postwar international work of trade unions.

“This is a great accomplishment for Prof. Garland, and an even greater recognition of our faculty’s impact on students locally and globally,” said KCC History, Philosophy & Political Science Department Chair Michael Barnhart. “Given the evolving global conversation about immigration and border protections, students enrolled in Prof. Garland’s course will be engaged in lively and active dialogue about this all-important conversation. We are proud that she will be representing Kingsborough, and the Organization of American Historians with this terrific honor.”

 

Written by Dawn Walker

Fellowship Application Tips

Now is the time of year when fellowship application deadlines are fast approaching.  Since you have already completed the FFPP, here is a short list of opportunities and advice that can support your continued research and writing:

Your scholarly production is absolutely essential to CUNY’s mission of access, equity, and opportunity–we wish you all the best!