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J. Bret Maney translates Manhattan Tropics in new bilingual edition

Congratulations to FFPP Alum Bret Maney (Lehman College) for the release of his translation of Guillermo Cotto-Thorner’s Manhattan Tropics. Maney also edited this bilingual edition, published as Manhattan Tropics/Trópico en Manhattan. The first novel of the Puerto Rican mass migration to New York City, and one of the early novels of Puerto Rican New York, Manhattan Tropics appears as part of the “Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Series” from Arte Público Press at the University of Houston.

Originally published in 1951 as Trópico en Manhattan, it was the first novel to focus on the postwar influx of Puerto Ricans to New York. Cotto-Thorner’s use of code-switching, or “Spanglish,” reflects the characters’ bicultural reality and makes the novel a forerunner of Nuyorican writing and contemporary Latino literature. This new bilingual edition contains a first-ever English translation by J. Bret Maney that artfully captures the style and spirit of the original Spanish. The novel’s exploration of class, race and gender—while demonstrating the community’s resilience and cultural pride—ensures its relevance today.

 

 

Matt Brim coedits Imagining Queer Methods

Imagining Queer Methods showcases the methodological renaissance unfolding in queer scholarship. The volume brings together emerging and esteemed researchers from all corners of the academy who are defining new directions for the field by asking “How do we do queer theory?”

From critical race studies, history, journalism, lesbian feminist studies, literature, media studies, and performance studies to anthropology, education, psychology, sociology, and urban planning, this impressive interdisciplinary collection covers topics such as humanistic approaches to reading, theorizing, and interpreting, as well as scientific appeals to measurement, modeling, sampling, and statistics.

Matt Brim is Associate Professor of Queer Studies in the English department at the College of Staten Island, CUNY. His books include James Baldwin and the Queer Imagination (U. of Michigan Press, 2014) and the forthcoming Poor Queer Studies: Confronting Elitism in the University (Duke U. Press, 2020), which reorients the field of queer studies away from elite institutions of higher education and toward working class schools, students, theories, and pedagogies. With Dr. Shelly Eversley, he is Academic Director of the Faculty Fellowship Publication Program.

Looking for a master list of education journals?

Hi FFPP Peeps,

Some of  your institutions might subscribe to a service called Cabell’s that lists acceptance rates, time to publication, and other useful kinds of information. For those in the field of education who do not have access to this, I found this pretty comprehensive chart. It could be useful as a reminder of all the journals out there and for those who would like to cite acceptance rates for your tenure packets and CVs.

JOURNAL RATES

Debbie Sonu

Hunter College

New FFPP Publication

I contributed a chapter to the edited collection, The Strange Careers of the Jim Crow North: Segregation and Struggle outside the South, edited by Brian Purnell and Jeanne Theoharis (Brooklyn College), with Komozi Woodard (NYU Press, April 2019). My chapter is entitled, “Black Women as Activist Intellectuals: Ella Baker and Mae Mallory Combat Northern Jim Crow in New York City’s Public Schools during the 1950s.”Kristopher Burrell, Conversations in Black Freedom Studies, Schomburg Center, Jim Crow North

Lara Saguisag wins Popular Culture Association’s Ray and Pat Browne Award AND is nominated for Eisner Award for Best Scholarly Work

Lara Saguisag (College of Staten Island), a 2014-15 FFPP Fellow, has won the Popular Culture Association’s Ray and Pat Browne Award for Best Single Work by One or More Author for Incorrigibles and Innocents: Constructing Childhood and Citizenship in Progressive Era Comics (Rutgers UP 2018). Lara has also been nominated for the Eisner award for Best Scholarly Work for Incorrigibles and Innocents.

Incorrigibles and Innocents

 

Incorrigibles and Innocents examines the ways childhood was depicted and theorized in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century comic strips. Drawing from and building on histories and theories of childhood, comics, and Progressive Era conceptualizations of citizenship and nationhood, Saguisag demonstrates that child characters in comic strips expressed and complicated contemporary notions of who had a right to claim membership in a modernizing, expanding nation.

Congratulations to Lara!

New Publications from FFPP Fellows Sarah C. Bishop and Seth Offenbach

Congratulations to former FFPP Fellows Sarah C. Bishop (Baruch) and Seth Offenbach (Bronx Community College), for the publications of their new books!  Our Community of Scholars is thrilled to celebrate the realization of your hard work.

Sarah’s book, Undocumented Storytellers:  Narrating the Immigrant Rights Movement (Oxford UP, 2019)  offers “a critical exploration of the ways undocumented immigrant activists harness the power of storytelling to mitigate the fear and uncertainty of life without legal status and to advocate for immigration reform. Sarah C. Bishop chronicles the ways young people uncover their lack of legal status experientially — through interactions with parents, in attempts to pursue rites of passage reserved for citizens, and as audiences of political and popular media. She provides both theoretical and pragmatic contextualization as activist narrators recount the experiences that influenced their decisions to cultivate public voices.”

And Seth’s The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War:  The Other Side of Vietnam (Routledge, 2019), explains how the conflict shaped modern conservatism. The war caused disputes between the pro-war anti-communists right and libertarian conservatives who opposed the war. At the same time, Christian evangelicals supported the war and began forming alliances with the mainstream, pro-war right. This enabled the formation of the New Right movement which came to dominate U.S. politics at the end of the twentieth century. The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War explains the right’s changes between Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan.

Grant Writing @ CUNY

At FFPP’s April 12th Professional Development Day, John Tsapogas from the Research Foundation led a workshop on STEM grant writing at CUNY. While we asked John to gear his presentation toward investigators in STEM fields, he offered valuable advice for all CUNY faculty, including in the humanities and social sciences. We encourage all Fellows to make use of the list of TIPS FOR WRITING COMPETITIVE PROPOSALS below. For the full grant writing presentation, see Grant Writing @ CUNY.  All Fellows engaged in quantitative research should familiarize themselves with the CUNY Graduate Center Quantitative Research Consulting Center.

 

TIPS FOR WRITING COMPETITIVE PROPOSALS

–Sponsors want to know the size and scope of intellectual payoff

–Proposal should use plain, simple English-avoid technical language as much as possible

–This is not a journal article presenting research results it is a proposal to conduct research

–Identify what you will study (research questions, theories, hypotheses, methods), your research plan, your team, and your budget, your project evaluation

–Do not include more information than requested in the announcement

–Use tables, figures, and flow charts to save words if you need more space

–Adhere to all formatting rules (page limitations, font sizes, style of biosketches of key personnel, bibliography) and make it visually appealing and easy on reviewers

–Include sufficient budget justification, current and pending support, institutional facilities and equipment to be used in the research, a data management plan, and postdoctoral mentoring plan, IRB, and letters of commitment if needed

–Get your proposals peer reviewed by RF APPS prior to submission. If heavily data oriented use the CUNY Graduate Center Quantitative Research Consulting Center

on academic publishing

In our conversations about academic publishing at our Professional Development Day on April 12, we received some great advice from the book and journal editors who came as our special guests.  Much of their advice is included in your FFPP Tool Kit.

We also received news of the current call for papers from WSQ, and several opportunities to publish with the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.

And the CFP database hosted by the Department of English at University of Pennsylvania lists a broad range of journal publishing opportunities.

This article from The Chronicle of Higher Education by Steven Pinker, Why Academic writing stinks is available here.

Tenure and Promotion @CUNY

Tenure and Promotion @CUNY

During FFPP’s Professional Development Day on April 12, we put together a  FFPP TENURE AND PROMOTION PRESENTATION of some suggestions that can help pre-tenure assistant professors plan for their tenure and promotion.  While it is necessary that you confirm the expectations and timelines relevant to the standards at your home campus, this presentation can provide a general guide.

PSC CUNY also provides an important summary of faculty rights during the tenure and promotion processes.  It also published on faculty Personnel Files that came up in our discussion.  You can also find more information and advice about your Personnel File and about your presence on CUNYfirst by consulting the faculty handbook on your home campus.  And as always, your Department Chair and Provost are excellent resources as you prepare for tenure and promotion.