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Looking for a master list of education journals?

Hi FFPP Peeps,

Some of  your institutions might subscribe to a service called Cabell’s that lists acceptance rates, time to publication, and other useful kinds of information. For those in the field of education who do not have access to this, I found this pretty comprehensive chart. It could be useful as a reminder of all the journals out there and for those who would like to cite acceptance rates for your tenure packets and CVs.

JOURNAL RATES

Debbie Sonu

Hunter College

New FFPP Publication

I contributed a chapter to the edited collection, The Strange Careers of the Jim Crow North: Segregation and Struggle outside the South, edited by Brian Purnell and Jeanne Theoharis (Brooklyn College), with Komozi Woodard (NYU Press, April 2019). My chapter is entitled, “Black Women as Activist Intellectuals: Ella Baker and Mae Mallory Combat Northern Jim Crow in New York City’s Public Schools during the 1950s.”Kristopher Burrell, Conversations in Black Freedom Studies, Schomburg Center, Jim Crow North

Lara Saguisag wins Popular Culture Association’s Ray and Pat Browne Award AND is nominated for Eisner Award for Best Scholarly Work

Lara Saguisag (College of Staten Island), a 2014-15 FFPP Fellow, has won the Popular Culture Association’s Ray and Pat Browne Award for Best Single Work by One or More Author for Incorrigibles and Innocents: Constructing Childhood and Citizenship in Progressive Era Comics (Rutgers UP 2018). Lara has also been nominated for the Eisner award for Best Scholarly Work for Incorrigibles and Innocents.

Incorrigibles and Innocents

 

Incorrigibles and Innocents examines the ways childhood was depicted and theorized in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century comic strips. Drawing from and building on histories and theories of childhood, comics, and Progressive Era conceptualizations of citizenship and nationhood, Saguisag demonstrates that child characters in comic strips expressed and complicated contemporary notions of who had a right to claim membership in a modernizing, expanding nation.

Congratulations to Lara!

New Publications from FFPP Fellows Sarah C. Bishop and Seth Offenbach

Congratulations to former FFPP Fellows Sarah C. Bishop (Baruch) and Seth Offenbach (Bronx Community College), for the publications of their new books!  Our Community of Scholars is thrilled to celebrate the realization of your hard work.

Sarah’s book, Undocumented Storytellers:  Narrating the Immigrant Rights Movement (Oxford UP, 2019)  offers “a critical exploration of the ways undocumented immigrant activists harness the power of storytelling to mitigate the fear and uncertainty of life without legal status and to advocate for immigration reform. Sarah C. Bishop chronicles the ways young people uncover their lack of legal status experientially — through interactions with parents, in attempts to pursue rites of passage reserved for citizens, and as audiences of political and popular media. She provides both theoretical and pragmatic contextualization as activist narrators recount the experiences that influenced their decisions to cultivate public voices.”

And Seth’s The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War:  The Other Side of Vietnam (Routledge, 2019), explains how the conflict shaped modern conservatism. The war caused disputes between the pro-war anti-communists right and libertarian conservatives who opposed the war. At the same time, Christian evangelicals supported the war and began forming alliances with the mainstream, pro-war right. This enabled the formation of the New Right movement which came to dominate U.S. politics at the end of the twentieth century. The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War explains the right’s changes between Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan.

Grant Writing @ CUNY

At FFPP’s April 12th Professional Development Day, John Tsapogas from the Research Foundation led a workshop on STEM grant writing at CUNY. While we asked John to gear his presentation toward investigators in STEM fields, he offered valuable advice for all CUNY faculty, including in the humanities and social sciences. We encourage all Fellows to make use of the list of TIPS FOR WRITING COMPETITIVE PROPOSALS below. For the full grant writing presentation, see Grant Writing @ CUNY.  All Fellows engaged in quantitative research should familiarize themselves with the CUNY Graduate Center Quantitative Research Consulting Center.

 

TIPS FOR WRITING COMPETITIVE PROPOSALS

–Sponsors want to know the size and scope of intellectual payoff

–Proposal should use plain, simple English-avoid technical language as much as possible

–This is not a journal article presenting research results it is a proposal to conduct research

–Identify what you will study (research questions, theories, hypotheses, methods), your research plan, your team, and your budget, your project evaluation

–Do not include more information than requested in the announcement

–Use tables, figures, and flow charts to save words if you need more space

–Adhere to all formatting rules (page limitations, font sizes, style of biosketches of key personnel, bibliography) and make it visually appealing and easy on reviewers

–Include sufficient budget justification, current and pending support, institutional facilities and equipment to be used in the research, a data management plan, and postdoctoral mentoring plan, IRB, and letters of commitment if needed

–Get your proposals peer reviewed by RF APPS prior to submission. If heavily data oriented use the CUNY Graduate Center Quantitative Research Consulting Center

Moustafa Bayoumi coedits The Selected Works of Edward Said

The renowned literary and cultural critic Edward Said was one of our era’s most provocative and important thinkers. This comprehensive collection of his work, expanded from the earlier Edward Said Reader, now draws from across his entire four-decade career, including his posthumously published books, making it a definitive one-volume source.
The Selected Works includes key sections from all of Said’s books, including his groundbreaking Orientalism; his memoir, Out of Place; and his last book, On Late Style. Whether writing of Zionism or Palestinian self-determination, Jane Austen or Yeats, or of music or the media, Said’s uncompromising intelligence casts urgent light on every subject he undertakes. The Selected Works is a joy for the general reader and an indispensable resource for scholars in the many fields that his work has influenced and transformed.

Moustafa Bayoumi is a professor of English at Brooklyn College, City University of New York. He is the author of the critically acclaimed How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America (Penguin), which won an American Book Award and the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction. His book, This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror (NYU Press), was chosen as a Best Book of 2015 by The Progressive magazine and was also awarded the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction.

Bridgett Davis Publishes New Memoir

A daughter’s moving homage to an extraordinary parent, The World According to Fannie Davis is also the suspenseful, unforgettable story about the lengths to which a mother will go to “make a way out of no way” to provide a prosperous life for her family — and how those sacrifices resonate over time.

Bridgett M. Davis is Professor of Journalism and the Writing Professions at Baruch College, CUNY, where she teaches creative, film and narrative writing. Davis is the director of the award-winning feature film Naked Acts, as well as the author of two novels, Into the Go-Slow and Shifting Through Neutral.

Siraj Ahmed Wins MLA Book Prize!

Former FFPP Fellow Siraj Ahmed wins MLA Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies for his book, Archeology of Babel:  The Colonial Foundation of the Humanities (Stanford UP, 2018).

The Archeology of Babel “argues that the privilege philology has always enjoyed within the modern humanities silently reinforces a colonial hierarchy. In fact, each of philology’s foundational innovations originally served British rule in India.

Tracing an unacknowledged history that extends from British Orientalist Sir William Jones to Palestinian American intellectual Edward Said and beyond, Archaeology of Babel excavates the epistemic transformation that was engendered on a global scale by the colonial reconstruction of native languages, literatures, and law. In the process, it reveals the extent to which even postcolonial studies and European philosophy—not to mention discourses as disparate as Islamic fundamentalism, Hindu nationalism, and global environmentalism—are the progeny of colonial rule. Going further, it unearths the alternate concepts of language and literature that were lost along the way and issues its own call for humanists to reckon with the politics of the philological practices to which they now return.”

You can read the Prologue of his prize-winning book from Stanford University Press.

Siraj Ahmed is professor of English at the Graduate Center and comparative literature at Lehman College.

Mid-Career Faculty Fellowship Program–application deadline 10/30

Hello Colleagues!

The Office of Academic Affairs at CUNY’s Central Office has announced a faculty fellowship program for mid-career colleagues.  It provides release time, working groups, and mentoring in the service of promotion to full professor.  The application deadline is October 30.

Please follow this link for the application and more details.

http://www2.cuny.edu/academics/faculty-affairs/faculty-development-across-cuny/mid-career-faculty-fellowship-program/